What We’re Reading: 2018 edition

It’s been a while since we shared our favorite titles! Some of these are books we read quite a while ago and I never got around to recommending, and some are still fresh in my mind. I will try keep my words to a minimum, and in some cases I might just include a favorite quote from a book and cross my fingers in hope that you will be inspired to read it.

Over the past year, I’ve felt especially compelled to learn more about the lives of people who are marginalized, to listen to a new set of stories.… Continue Reading “What We’re Reading: 2018 edition”

International Women’s Day: A Defense and a Lament

When my daughter was born, the medical staff asked what name to write down. Without looking at one another, my husband and I both replied, “Magdalena.” We had another name in mind too, but as soon as we saw her face, we knew we wanted her to carry the story of a woman loved by God and chosen as the first to see his resurrected face. In a society where a woman’s testimony and personal worth had little value, it seems no mistake on God’s part that he chose a woman as a first witness to his resurrection.… Continue Reading “International Women’s Day: A Defense and a Lament”

Perspectives from Abroad (Part 3): On Sharing our Lives and Connecting with the Church

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Thanks for following along with this blog series! (Click here to read Part One and Part Two) Today’s post is the final installment of testimonies from people who serve cross-culturally, sharing their experiences relating to friends, family, and the church back in their passport countries.

One of the things that compelled me to start this series was hearing other missionaries share some of the expectations people/churches had for them in returning to the US, and hearing in their voices how those expectations can take a big personal toll.… Continue Reading “Perspectives from Abroad (Part 3): On Sharing our Lives and Connecting with the Church”

Perspectives from Abroad (Part 2): Perceptions, the West, and Global Identity

Welcome to part two of a three-part series on what it is like to relate with one’s passport country after living abroad. (Click here to read Part One) This series shares a dozen different perspectives from all over the world on some of the issues overseas workers face as they transition between their passport country and another culture. Part two focuses on the realities of life overseas, the global identity one gains while living abroad, and on how the West is perceived by the rest of the world.… Continue Reading “Perspectives from Abroad (Part 2): Perceptions, the West, and Global Identity”

Assimilate or Go Home | Book Recommendation

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“I had found people as different from me as the night is from the day. What I didn’t know then was that the seeds of my own blindness were orchestrating my thoughts. For, of course, in viewing our differences, I thought I was the sun and they were the darkness.”

– from Assimilate or Go Home: Notes from a Failed Missionary on Rediscovering Faith

I wanted to take a moment to praise a book I recently read, in hopes that some of you who are looking for a good read might check it out.… Continue Reading “Assimilate or Go Home | Book Recommendation”

Unfamiliar Soil: A window into cross-cultural work

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This is an essay about working cross-culturally, particularly church planting, and why it is not a short term project. [To note: Frankly, I dislike the term ”church planter” almost as much as I dislike the terms “missionary,” and “missional,” and I wish I didn’t have to use it at all. “Church planting” feels like a marketing catchphrase that has become a means of denoting those who are a few rungs higher on the spirituality ladder. But the topic of overused Christian catchphrases (“love on,” anyone?)  is another grievance for another time.]

First, a personal anecdote to help the conversation: I had lofty aspirations of container gardening when we first arrived in Yangon.… Continue Reading “Unfamiliar Soil: A window into cross-cultural work”